Hadley’s Adventures

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For those of you who have been to the ranch, you have almost certainly seen the Butch Cassidy Hideout, an old cabin in which Butch Cassidy and his crew stayed when they were running from the law. It is a small, well-hidden cabin a few miles from the ranch. It is Bayard’s favorite ride and…

A couple of weeks ago Richard and I went down to the farm on a Sunday for a marathon day. Our goals were ambitious: 1. Catch riding horses, tack them up and trailer them over to the field that (hopefully) houses the Team Sorters (shock of shocks– they’ve been escaping recently!). FYI: Team Sorting is…

Saturday’s sky is overcast, and there is a strange haze hanging over the ranch, the sort of haze we normally see mid-summer when there are large forest fires in Colorado or Nevada. I am on the bench riding Arizona, one of our flashy brown and white paint horses, in a western saddle and wearing my…

It is always a bittersweet moment when we move from the farm to the ranch in May. I love the activity of the summer season: riding with our returning guests, who have become dear friends over the years, and meeting new guests, getting the chance to see the ranch for the first time all over…

Throughout the winter at the farm, we move the horses every month or two to a new pasture to graze. We throw open the gates, call them in high-pitched voices and lure them toward the open gate with a hay truck. They quickly figure out they are moving (literally) to greener pastures, and they soar…

Last Tuesday morning Richard and I drove to Dubois for a Grazing Association meeting and a Forest Service meeting, with plans to stay the night at the ranch with Mel and Bayard. The East Fork Grazing Association consists of three families: the Foxes, the Finleys and the Lindsays. The association is allowed to have 300…

Branding is a very social event in Wyoming. Ranchers often make a party out of branding day by having a cook-out and inviting friends and family to take part. These ranchers frequently ride horseback and rope their calves in order to brand them. Doing it this way requires a lot of people and some very…

I apologize it has been a few weeks since I entered a blog post, everybody! I went back to North Carolina to see my family for a week, met Richard in Columbus, Ohio, for Equine Affaire and have been busy trying to get my life in order since I got back to Wyoming. To let…

The Stage: A 70 acre pasture filled with sage brush and native grasses, two shallow ponds, the perfect duck habitat for Bayard, and Russian olive trees galore: The Players: Hadley, Richard and Whistle. (Gupta’s role is to stay in the truck and provide a soundtrack of desperate barking throughout the entire mission. She doesn’t understand…

On Wednesday Richard and I, along with Bob and Jim (the two men who work for us year-round at the farm), processed the heifers. To give you a feel for the day, you need to meet my “heifer processing” teammates (at least, you need to meet them photographically!).  And,  yes, “heifer processing” is unquestionably a…